Norman Foster designed Ocean Pearl. When I am on board I just want to hug him :) Every corner is well thought out. Good design is everything.

Norman Foster designed Ocean Pearl. When I am on board I just want to hug him :) Every corner is well thought out. Good design is everything.

Buongiorno Capri!

Buongiorno Capri!

Sailing to Rome. Who’s there?

Sailing to Rome. Who’s there?

Fun at the farm in Menorca

What liking habits say about cultures

Lately I have been noticing that when a Swedish friend of mine posts something on Facebook other Swedish friends are much more likely to like it than when French or British friends post something. Does this mean that the Swedes are especially supportive of their friends? I am convinced that Facebook can be a remarkable resource for anthropologists and sociologists. There is so much information there about cultural behavior. I wonder if Facebook let’s academics in to study cultures.

La reacción inexplicable del economista Xavier Sala-i-Martin

  1. se permiten críticas y también preguntas: ¿por qué Argentina (o ninguna ex colonia) no quiere volver a España?

  2. perdona que te bloquee pero no me gusta que distorsionen mi nombre. Adiós.

  3. pues ya estamos: cualquier artículo que diga que “la verdad” implica que tendremos más deuda queda falseado.

  4. sí claro. ¿Dónde esta escrito que Catalunya debe pagar más deuda fuera de España que dentro?

  5. pues los ánimos no se calman anunciando calamidades que no aguantan el mínimo escrutinio intelectual.

  6. O sea que los catalanes son más bobos que los Suizos: ¿ellos pueden ser muy ricos fuera de España y del euro, pero Catalunya no?

  7. Si tan terriblemente se vive fuera de España, ¿por qué tu patria, Argentina, no pide la readmisión inmediata?

We own Torrenova,  in Menorca. But when I see monuments like this inside our farm, built many centuries ago, I realize that our ownership is at most a passing tenancy.

We own Torrenova, in Menorca. But when I see monuments like this inside our farm, built many centuries ago, I realize that our ownership is at most a passing tenancy.

neurosciencestuff:

Facebook’s facial recognition software is now as accurate as the human brain, but what now?
Facebook’s facial recognition research project, DeepFace (yes really), is now very nearly as accurate as the human brain. DeepFace can look at two photos, and irrespective of lighting or angle, can say with 97.25% accuracy whether the photos contain the same face. Humans can perform the same task with 97.53% accuracy. DeepFace is currently just a research project, but in the future it will likely be used to help with facial recognition on the Facebook website. It would also be irresponsible if we didn’t mention the true power of facial recognition, which Facebook is surely investigating: Tracking your face across the entirety of the web, and in real life, as you move from shop to shop, producing some very lucrative behavioral tracking data indeed.
The DeepFace software, developed by the Facebook AI research group in Menlo Park, California, is underpinned by an advanced deep learning neural network. A neural network, as you may already know, is a piece of software that simulates a (very basic) approximation of how real neurons work. Deep learning is one of many methods of performing machine learning; basically, it looks at a huge body of data (for example, human faces) and tries to develop a high-level abstraction (of a human face) by looking for recurring patterns (cheeks, eyebrow, etc). In this case, DeepFace consists of a bunch of neurons nine layers deep, and then a learning process that sees the creation of 120 million connections (synapses) between those neurons, based on a corpus of four million photos of faces.
Read more

DeepFace of Facebook gets as good as humans in face recognition.

neurosciencestuff:

Facebook’s facial recognition software is now as accurate as the human brain, but what now?

Facebook’s facial recognition research project, DeepFace (yes really), is now very nearly as accurate as the human brain. DeepFace can look at two photos, and irrespective of lighting or angle, can say with 97.25% accuracy whether the photos contain the same face. Humans can perform the same task with 97.53% accuracy. DeepFace is currently just a research project, but in the future it will likely be used to help with facial recognition on the Facebook website. It would also be irresponsible if we didn’t mention the true power of facial recognition, which Facebook is surely investigating: Tracking your face across the entirety of the web, and in real life, as you move from shop to shop, producing some very lucrative behavioral tracking data indeed.

The DeepFace software, developed by the Facebook AI research group in Menlo Park, California, is underpinned by an advanced deep learning neural network. A neural network, as you may already know, is a piece of software that simulates a (very basic) approximation of how real neurons work. Deep learning is one of many methods of performing machine learning; basically, it looks at a huge body of data (for example, human faces) and tries to develop a high-level abstraction (of a human face) by looking for recurring patterns (cheeks, eyebrow, etc). In this case, DeepFace consists of a bunch of neurons nine layers deep, and then a learning process that sees the creation of 120 million connections (synapses) between those neurons, based on a corpus of four million photos of faces.

Read more

DeepFace of Facebook gets as good as humans in face recognition.

techfutures:

FIRST 3-D PRINTED SKULL PROSTHESIS SUITABLE FOR HUMAN USE INSTALLED
(Holland) Circumventing conventional skull substitution techniques, Dutch scientists led by Dr. Bon Verweij at the University Medical Center in Utrecht have devised the world’s first 3-D printed replacement skull prosthesis suitable for human use to assist a woman who suffers from a rare, debilitating bone disease. The transparent, semi-rigid plastic, brain-sheath was switched with the patient’s skull, that due to its idiosyncratic articulation and perpetual grown, impaired her vision and caused considerable pain.
The bleeding-edge plastic skull replaced 75% of the patient’s original skull was 3-D printed to exact specifications, made from polyetherketoneketone thermoplastic because the labor hours and cost of manually tooling an inert prosthetic skull proved cost-prohibitive. The family of trusty plastics is renowned for durability and have a particularly high melting point, making them ideal for use in sterile applications; this first 3-D printed prosthetic skull consists of a new, “mysterious material” that experts indicate is the superior example.
The notably transparent material clearly reveals the brain and vascular system just below the scalp to offer an unprecedented view of brain structures; it excitingly portends both further anatomical study and views.
 (via childproof)

techfutures:

FIRST 3-D PRINTED SKULL PROSTHESIS SUITABLE FOR HUMAN USE INSTALLED

(Holland) Circumventing conventional skull substitution techniques, Dutch scientists led by Dr. Bon Verweij at the University Medical Center in Utrecht have devised the world’s first 3-D printed replacement skull prosthesis suitable for human use to assist a woman who suffers from a rare, debilitating bone disease. The transparent, semi-rigid plastic, brain-sheath was switched with the patient’s skull, that due to its idiosyncratic articulation and perpetual grown, impaired her vision and caused considerable pain.

The bleeding-edge plastic skull replaced 75% of the patient’s original skull was 3-D printed to exact specifications, made from polyetherketoneketone thermoplastic because the labor hours and cost of manually tooling an inert prosthetic skull proved cost-prohibitive. The family of trusty plastics is renowned for durability and have a particularly high melting point, making them ideal for use in sterile applications; this first 3-D printed prosthetic skull consists of a new, “mysterious material” that experts indicate is the superior example.

The notably transparent material clearly reveals the brain and vascular system just below the scalp to offer an unprecedented view of brain structures; it excitingly portends both further anatomical study and views.


(via childproof)

(via futureofscience)

neurosciencestuff:

Brain scans link concern for justice with reason, not emotion
People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion, according to new brain scan research from the Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice—for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly or mercifully. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.    
Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.” 
According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

neurosciencestuff:

Brain scans link concern for justice with reason, not emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion, according to new brain scan research from the Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice—for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly or mercifully. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.    

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.” 

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

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